Stadttheater
These posters have a very well-defined structure. It definitely feels like tabular data and tabular data is one such case that the disposition of the information extrapolates the realm of graphic layout and starts hinting on the meaning of data and how various chunks of data relate to each other. The abuse of tables as structural elements was, and still is, very harmful to web accessibility. However, blindly replacing tables for div tags does not help to make code more semantic. List elements are a great solution for collections of similar data, but ULs and OLs do not define any kind of relation between this data.
Alec Zimmerman

Stadttheater

These posters have a very well-defined structure. It definitely feels like tabular data and tabular data is one such case that the disposition of the information extrapolates the realm of graphic layout and starts hinting on the meaning of data and how various chunks of data relate to each other. The abuse of tables as structural elements was, and still is, very harmful to web accessibility. However, blindly replacing tables for div tags does not help to make code more semantic. List elements are a great solution for collections of similar data, but ULs and OLs do not define any kind of relation between this data.

Alec Zimmerman


Joseph Müller Brockman 
Joseph Müller Brockman 1955 design in the series for concert posters for the Tonhalle Gesellschaft Zürich. This is one of the first posters in a series that he designed for the Tonhalle Gesellschaft Zürich that truly exemplified the New Graphic Design approach. It was like a design tsunami sweeping over the international graphic design community.
Alec Zimmerman

Joseph Müller Brockman 

Joseph Müller Brockman 1955 design in the series for concert posters for the Tonhalle Gesellschaft Zürich. This is one of the first posters in a series that he designed for the Tonhalle Gesellschaft Zürich that truly exemplified the New Graphic Design approach. It was like a design tsunami sweeping over the international graphic design community.

Alec Zimmerman



Look Ma, no brains!
This looks fun. Nothing like using a busty woman straddling something to sell it. This was designed for Gilera Motorcycles by Gino Boccasile in 1949. This is a very effective design for many reasons.
To start with the obvious, it is apparent that both the people are having a good time. The colours used are mainly in the neutral palette, but the lady’s top is a vibrant orange, and the gas tank is a solid red. this makes both these items focal points. This is important because you look at her for typical male reasons, and at the tank because the company name is on it. After that you notice the motorcycle and it appears to be moving very fast giving a sense of freedom. Next comes the big bold yellow text at the bottom, in case you missed the gas tank there is no doubt about the company name now. Finally the eyes move back up to the top and see the small purple type at the top which translates as “to closed eyes” which I’m assuming is a catch phrase of sorts.
on a final note, the little red sign on the front fender acts as an arrow pointing to the gas tank with the company name. To draw even more focus to the gas tank is the fact that it’s positioned just at the edge of the lady’s short skirt making it a very strong focal point. I guess it’s true what they say, “Sex sells.”
Posted by Dan

Look Ma, no brains!

This looks fun. Nothing like using a busty woman straddling something to sell it. This was designed for Gilera Motorcycles by Gino Boccasile in 1949. This is a very effective design for many reasons.

To start with the obvious, it is apparent that both the people are having a good time. The colours used are mainly in the neutral palette, but the lady’s top is a vibrant orange, and the gas tank is a solid red. this makes both these items focal points. This is important because you look at her for typical male reasons, and at the tank because the company name is on it. After that you notice the motorcycle and it appears to be moving very fast giving a sense of freedom. Next comes the big bold yellow text at the bottom, in case you missed the gas tank there is no doubt about the company name now. Finally the eyes move back up to the top and see the small purple type at the top which translates as “to closed eyes” which I’m assuming is a catch phrase of sorts.

on a final note, the little red sign on the front fender acts as an arrow pointing to the gas tank with the company name. To draw even more focus to the gas tank is the fact that it’s positioned just at the edge of the lady’s short skirt making it a very strong focal point. I guess it’s true what they say, “Sex sells.”

Posted by Dan


Enough monkey business
Gotta love things that make you go, “What the hell??” This is an ad for Anisetta Evangelisti Liquore. It was designed in 1925 by Carlo Biscaretti, and I love it. As with most Italian design the idea is to focus on fun and living life. This ad shows that no matter what species you are you’ll have fun drinking their beverages.
All the colours are in the warm palette which give the whole ad a sense of coziness and relaxation. The colours are also vivid which implies fun and jubilation. The text at the top is large and uses a red border to help it standout from the yellow background. The text has a slight arc to it which makes the eye see the name of the company first, and then drop into the ad.
The whole ad is fun and inviting, and makes me kind of want to see why everyone gets excited about drinking. Even the monkey’s face shows the fun he’s having.
Posted by Dan

Enough monkey business

Gotta love things that make you go, “What the hell??” This is an ad for Anisetta Evangelisti Liquore. It was designed in 1925 by Carlo Biscaretti, and I love it. As with most Italian design the idea is to focus on fun and living life. This ad shows that no matter what species you are you’ll have fun drinking their beverages.

All the colours are in the warm palette which give the whole ad a sense of coziness and relaxation. The colours are also vivid which implies fun and jubilation. The text at the top is large and uses a red border to help it standout from the yellow background. The text has a slight arc to it which makes the eye see the name of the company first, and then drop into the ad.

The whole ad is fun and inviting, and makes me kind of want to see why everyone gets excited about drinking. Even the monkey’s face shows the fun he’s having.

Posted by Dan


The Casino De Paris
This is a French program of sorts for The Casino De Paris music hall located in Paris. This one from the early 1960’s and “features several risque burlesque photos” (ooh la la!).
I will say this is very risque and has the French feel. This woman looks like she is very much enjoying herself.
As I’ve noticed in past posts, designers seemed to figure out how compliment blocky and script type. The colors used make it feel very balanced. “Casino De Paris” at the top is white, matching the… uh… fur… on the woman. The “avec Frenesies” is yellow, matching the woman’s hair. Having each color placed so far apart helps to keep your eyes on the image, despite her long legs pointing your eyes off the page.
Very velveting image.

Posted by Laura

The Casino De Paris

This is a French program of sorts for The Casino De Paris music hall located in Paris. This one from the early 1960’s and “features several risque burlesque photos” (ooh la la!).

I will say this is very risque and has the French feel. This woman looks like she is very much enjoying herself.

As I’ve noticed in past posts, designers seemed to figure out how compliment blocky and script type. The colors used make it feel very balanced. “Casino De Paris” at the top is white, matching the… uh… fur… on the woman. The “avec Frenesies” is yellow, matching the woman’s hair. Having each color placed so far apart helps to keep your eyes on the image, despite her long legs pointing your eyes off the page.

Very velveting image.

Posted by Laura


'He's dynamite with a gun or a girl.'
This is a French movie poster for This Gun for Hire. It is a 1942 film noir classic and stares Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd.
I love the contrast in colors and how it was used to create depth. Cool colors recede into the background, having Alan Ladd in red and in front caused him to feel closer than Veronica Lake, despite how much larger she is. I supposed it feels layered. The colors also make this feel dangerous and mysterious, which, I assume, is the feeling they were going for.
The type used for the title feels a bit chaotic and scary, adding to the overall dangerous feeling of the poster. The rest of the type is blocky and squared, giving it more of an edgy feeling. The only type not following this is the Paramount Pictures logo, which is required to be that way. However, it’s placement and colors help to make it a little more subtle, blending it with the rest of the poster.

Posted by Laura

'He's dynamite with a gun or a girl.'

This is a French movie poster for This Gun for Hire. It is a 1942 film noir classic and stares Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd.

I love the contrast in colors and how it was used to create depth. Cool colors recede into the background, having Alan Ladd in red and in front caused him to feel closer than Veronica Lake, despite how much larger she is. I supposed it feels layered. The colors also make this feel dangerous and mysterious, which, I assume, is the feeling they were going for.

The type used for the title feels a bit chaotic and scary, adding to the overall dangerous feeling of the poster. The rest of the type is blocky and squared, giving it more of an edgy feeling. The only type not following this is the Paramount Pictures logo, which is required to be that way. However, it’s placement and colors help to make it a little more subtle, blending it with the rest of the poster.

Posted by Laura


 
Grotesk
Switzerland had survived WWII as a neutral country along with Sweden and a group of Swiss designers, who had been developing fresh, new, concepts of design from the 1930’s on, now came onto the center stage of International graphic design. After the war, the Swiss Haas type foundry commisioned Max Miedinger to refine and upgraph their older Akzidenz Grotesk fonts and they marketed the revision as Neue Haas Grotesk (San-serif type faces go by the name Grotesk in Europe). Around 1958 the German D. Stempel AG typefoundry bought it up and introduced it as Helvetica and the rest is history. I have read that Miedinger died a bitter man as he only received a flat fee for the original redesign.
Alec Zimmerman

Grotesk

Switzerland had survived WWII as a neutral country along with Sweden and a group of Swiss designers, who had been developing fresh, new, concepts of design from the 1930’s on, now came onto the center stage of International graphic design. After the war, the Swiss Haas type foundry commisioned Max Miedinger to refine and upgraph their older Akzidenz Grotesk fonts and they marketed the revision as Neue Haas Grotesk (San-serif type faces go by the name Grotesk in Europe). Around 1958 the German D. Stempel AG typefoundry bought it up and introduced it as Helvetica and the rest is history. I have read that Miedinger died a bitter man as he only received a flat fee for the original redesign.

Alec Zimmerman


Replica
Here’s a great book that’s just been released by Lars Müller Publishers titled Corporate Diversity: Swiss Graphic Design and Advertising by Geigy, 1940 – 1970. Designed by Norm and set in their typeface Replica (thanks Jonathan!), it features the brilliant work of the in house design studio at J. R. Geigy AG, most of which was created for the medical industry. Geigy was based in Basel and the work helped spread the International Typographic Style with its minimal approach and by employing designers such as Karl Gerstner, Jörg Hamburger, Toshihiro Katayama and Armin Hofmann.
Alec Zimmerman

Replica

Here’s a great book that’s just been released by Lars Müller Publishers titled Corporate Diversity: Swiss Graphic Design and Advertising by Geigy, 1940 – 1970. Designed by Norm and set in their typeface Replica (thanks Jonathan!), it features the brilliant work of the in house design studio at J. R. Geigy AG, most of which was created for the medical industry. Geigy was based in Basel and the work helped spread the International Typographic Style with its minimal approach and by employing designers such as Karl Gerstner, Jörg Hamburger, Toshihiro Katayama and Armin Hofmann.

Alec Zimmerman



Ah..Venice
Or as Indiana Jones would say, “I love Venice.” This is an Italian travel poster from around 1940, and unfortunately that’s about all the information I could find on this poster. I found the image on a site selling vintage posters, and verified with other site that this is indeed an Italian travel poster from around 1940. However, that’s where the proverbial bread trail ends. I was really taken with the poster because it is entirely different from most of the other examples I have found of Italian design used in days past. All the lines in the hat draw the eye to the top of the head, and then from there you trace the woman’s face down to the name of the city. With the graceful curves and soft colours a story is told of romance and relaxation. I like that the feeling isn’t really one of luxury, but more of a simple life without worry.
Posted by Dan

Ah..Venice

Or as Indiana Jones would say, “I love Venice.” This is an Italian travel poster from around 1940, and unfortunately that’s about all the information I could find on this poster. I found the image on a site selling vintage posters, and verified with other site that this is indeed an Italian travel poster from around 1940. However, that’s where the proverbial bread trail ends. I was really taken with the poster because it is entirely different from most of the other examples I have found of Italian design used in days past. All the lines in the hat draw the eye to the top of the head, and then from there you trace the woman’s face down to the name of the city. With the graceful curves and soft colours a story is told of romance and relaxation. I like that the feeling isn’t really one of luxury, but more of a simple life without worry.

Posted by Dan



Olio di Oliva
I broadened my searching this week beyond just the 50’s and 60’s and found some good vintage designs. This was a poster created by Gino Boccasile in the 1930s, and has since become an iconic image. I feel that the poster works so well because it seems that everything was carefully planned and positioned for the desired effect. The contours of her from lead your eye to her face and then to the bottle of oil. The ladder in the background lead the eye to her arm and then to the oil. It seems that everything leads your eye to the bottle of oil to start. From there you follow the stream of oil being poured, past the cleavage, to the big bowl of salad, and then onto the name of the company: Olio Radino. Everything really supports the overall feel of the piece which is again enjoying the opulence of Italian life.
Posted by Dan

Olio di Oliva

I broadened my searching this week beyond just the 50’s and 60’s and found some good vintage designs. This was a poster created by Gino Boccasile in the 1930s, and has since become an iconic image. I feel that the poster works so well because it seems that everything was carefully planned and positioned for the desired effect. The contours of her from lead your eye to her face and then to the bottle of oil. The ladder in the background lead the eye to her arm and then to the oil. It seems that everything leads your eye to the bottle of oil to start. From there you follow the stream of oil being poured, past the cleavage, to the big bowl of salad, and then onto the name of the company: Olio Radino. Everything really supports the overall feel of the piece which is again enjoying the opulence of Italian life.

Posted by Dan



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